Publishing

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According to Scientific American, the not-so-open-access publisher Springer has just acquired the very open access pioneer site BioMed Central.

Regarding if BioMed Central will continue to be open access:

Those in the open access movement had watched BioMed Central with keen interest. Founded in 2000, it was the first for-profit open access publisher and advocates feared that when the company was sold, its approach might change. But Cockerill assured editors that a BMC board of trustees “will continue to safeguard BioMed Central’s open access policy in the future.” Springer “has been notable…for its willingness to experiment with open access publishing,” Cockerill said in a release circulated with the email to editors.

No information yet as to how much this acquisition cost.

What do you think about this? Will Springer just “experiment” with open access publishing for a while and then close the gates? Or is this a genuine attempt to join the OA movement?

The Journal of Visual Experiments (JoVE), a video-publication for biological research based in Sommerville, MA has recently been accepted for indexing in the hugely accessed PubMed and MEDLINE.

JoVE was founded in late 2006 as the first video-publication for biological research. With an editorial board including 20 scientists from leading academic institutions such as Harvard and Princeton. The online journal has grown to include over 200 video-protocols in fields such as immunology, neuroscience, microbiology and many others.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) advisory board decided to include what is now the first and only video-publication in their large publication database and by doing so demonstrates openness to new and innovative ways of sharing science.

Moshe Pritsker, Ph.D., co-founder of JoVE in an email sent to us states:

“Inclusion in PubMed/MEDLINE is a big milestone for JoVE, and for the scientific publishing in general. It demonstrates the official acceptance of new approaches to science communication, such as video online, by the scientific community. Overall, it will increase the interest of the scientists to communicate their findings in video, making biological sciences more transparent and efficient.”

PLoSJust a few days ago, an article by Declan Butler was published in Nature regarding PLoS‘ open-access publishing model. This article was not well accepted by various open access advocates and science bloggers in general.

Johnathan Eisen from The Tree of Life was the first (that I noticed) to responde to the article and then many others followed along the same line.

Shortly after, Timo Hannay posted a “take two” at Nature’s Nascent that seemed to settle things down.

What I find to be the most notorious aspect in this whole string of events is that there is quite a large community of science bloggers that are ready to offer their “peer-review” in situations such as these. Is this a good thing? I would like to believe so…

Anyhow, I’ve only mentioned a few of the reactions. You can find plenty more reactions over at Bora’s Blog Around the Clock.